The esteemed people of Planetizen.com are just some of the people talking about car parking challenges this week –

A Very Tight Hoboken Street (Planetizen.com)

Ian Sacs, Hoboken’s own Department of Transportation and Parking Director, writes an engaging and informative piece on how the exceptionally dense but car-enamored city is anticipating its urban parking problems and introducing Flexcar, bicycle infrastructure, and connectivity improvements to reduce the immense waste that car parking lots can be. You can read the whole article here.

Parking is an incredibly challenging issue for any architect, planner or transportation engineer. Parking spaces can cost upwards of $50,000 and other than hold a car for a bit, consume an incredible amount of wasted space. Interestingly, it is precisely these costs that are driving developers and politicians towards active transportation (rather than health or fun).

Portland State University (like Miami-Dade College, one of its downtown’s largest land holders) has been struggling with this issue. In a recent article in the Portland Daily Vanguard, writer Vinh Tran points out that PSU’s newest bicycle parking facility will provide parking for 75 students at the same cost of just adding 4 car spaces.

Here in Miami, some residents of Miami Beach are getting vocal about the increasing costs of parking. An article in The Miami Herald has spurred comments from residents who can’t believe they will have to pay $15 to park ON Lincoln Road. (That’s it!?) This writer wonders why anyone would choose to live in the densest, most pedestrian-friendly neighborhood in our county and then want to drive anywhere-

Parking is a global problem. In countries as (seemingly) different as Italy and Japan, vertical parking is popular:

Not everyone will drive a smart car…

…so transportation engineers who can think out of the box and design successful parking alternatives are in demand. Naturally, so are those of us who advocate for even less consumption of space – by traveling by bicycle, on foot or mass transit.

UPDATE: This afternoon, we received a link to a great image that shows Chicago’s proactive work on increasing bicycle parking in the last year alone. Our hats off to the people at Active Transportation Alliance, who largely deserve the credit for these successes. Wouldn’t it be great if the BPAC or City of Miami Bicycle Action Committee delivered work like this?

Click on the image for the full size image and more information.

What are your ideas for addressing an ever increasing need for car parking in an ever shrinking urban environment?

One Response to Let’s Talk about PARKING

  1. Mike Moskos says:

    Does anyone know why parking spaces now are at 90 degrees to the driving lane? I remember growing up (in South Florida), most of the spaces were angled so you could get in easier. Now, most spaces are at 90 degrees. Can you get more cars in when they’re 90 degrees? Is it a change in zoning laws?

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