Miami-Dade Public Transit “solves” homeless “problem” by removing the seats on the Metromover. 

As with every opportunity to engage on local transit issues, TrAC Miami is urging the public to come to the CTAC meeting on Wednesday, October 23 at 5:30pm to let them know what you think. (Government Center, 18th floor)

Is MDT is cutting off their nose to spite their face? One 2-person seat remains on each car for ADA compliance, but what if there are three people who actually need to be able to sit down? Like your mom, your grandpa or a pregnant woman and her children.  An employee attempted to explain the new policy as follows: MDT  has “struggled” to reduce use of the free public MetroMover by people who take up excessive space with their personal belongings. A number of users have complained about the mess and odor that some, likely homeless, people bring to our public transit. So what if said problem person takes the whole seat? What does MDT consider “struggling” to resolve this and improve the quality of our transit. Are the not concerned this could reduce ridership?

So…why not enforce a restriction of seats to one per person? There’s already funded security in the MetroMover cars. 

No More Seats for You!

One alternative that has been considered and rejected includes charging something minimal to ride the MetroMover – something that would be financially impossible. Time will tell if no seating becomes politically impossible.

 

8 Responses to MDT removes seats from Mover, makes transit less accessible

  1. Melanie Dawn says:

    My daughter and I noticed the missing seats last night on our way home from the Adrienne Arsht Center and wondered what happened. Thanks for the update!

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  2. Here’s my solution:
    The Smelly Car. – If you smell for any reason, you go there.

    to be followed in future by:
    The Ugly Car. – If you’re physically reprehensible, you go there.

    The Foreign Car. – If you intend to speak any language out loud other than English, you go there.

    The Phone Car. – If you intend to yell into your phone the affairs of your life, you go there.

    The Stupid Car. – If you’re a management level or elected government official, you go there.

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  3. John Hopkins says:

    What can they have been thinking over at the Transit Village? Has nobody with responsibility over there ever seen a weary office-worker heading home with a heavy briefcase and legs aching with varicose veins? A pregnant mother en route to a clinic with infant in tow? A weight-challenged commuter red of face and gasping with asthma? I’m just warming up: Any number of Miami’s residents and visitors have a valid reason for wanting a place to sit down.

    Taking the seats out of Metromover cars to discourage the homeless comes from the same thinking that has made the restrooms at Metro stops increasingly inaccessible. The thing is, steps like this turn away not only the vagrant but the paying rider.

    Maybe it’s time to reinstall the turnstiles or some other means of charging a negligible fee to ride the Metromover.

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  4. Jacob says:

    Another brilliant move by Miami transit planners. I, too, noticed the missing seats last week. I also saw a homeless person sleeping on the floor of the mover this past weekend, so I think that will be the trend. They’re going to ride the mover anyway (and why shouldn’t they?), so why reduce their already little dignity?

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  5. Anonymous says:

    As a regular Metromover user, I can say that the homeless riders have significantly declined since Camillus House moved to N.W. 7th Ave. However, there’s still a problem with people with too many carry-ons disenfranchising other patrons’ seat usage. And there’re still aimless riders (with no purposeful destination) taking up those precious few seats. They are NOT riding back-and-forth standing. As for security, there’s less now than there used to be. Besides, the media gets into a fit when security tries to enforce rules on Miami-Dade Transit (example: the singing lady on Metrorail). And I’ve seen a lot, lot worse than singing by unruly passengers and, lo and behold, security is never around. Perhaps two seats per Metromover car is extreme; a compromise could be two seats at each end. This could alleviate the purposeless riding and accomodate the elderly/handicapped needs of our fellow citizens. Let’s give it a go first!

       1 likes

  6. Anonymous says:

    As a regular Metromover user, I can say that the homeless riders have significantly declined since Camillus House moved to N.W. 7th Ave. However, there’s still a problem with people with too many carry-ons disenfranchising other patrons’ seat usage. And there’re still aimless riders (with no purposeful destination) taking up those precious few seats. They are NOT riding back-and-forth standing. As for security, there’s less now than there used to be. Besides, the media gets into a fit when security tries to enforce rules on Miami-Dade Transit (example: the singing lady on Metrorail). And I’ve seen a lot, lot worse than singing by unruly passengers and, lo and behold, security is never around. Perhaps two seats per Metromover car is extreme; a compromise could be two seats at each end. This could alleviate the purposeless riding and accomodate the elderly/handicapped needs of our fellow citizens. Let’s give it a go first!

       0 likes

  7. Fernando says:

    Even 5 cents a ride would be enough to keep the homeless away from metromover. They should reinstate the turnstiles and charge. OR get security on the metromover.

       0 likes

  8. don’t know if you all have done any follow-up on this but at the CTAC meeting on October 23 a represenative from MDT said the seat removals was part of a pilot program to allow for more space on the Metro-Mover in preparation of various events that have been periodically increasing mover usage.

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