Posts by: Felipe Azenha

Will our City commissioners finally come to their senses and realize we cannot evolve into a world-class city if we continue to require developers to adhere to minimum parking requirements that decrease affordability and perpetuate automobile use?

This discussion is long overdue, but finally the City Commission has agreed to conduct a public hearing on this issue.

The City will conduct a public hearing on this item on Thursday, October 23rd, 11:30 am at the City of Miami City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33131.

Below is a link to sign the petition and pledge to speak at the Commission meeting. Also if you sign up through this site, you will be sent updates, post your comments and see articles about this issue.

https://www.causes.com/campaigns/84406-exempt-miami-small-buildings-from-required-parking

Click on this link to send Miami Commissioners an email to voice your support for this parking exemption.

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Here’s a little more background at to why you should support the elimination of minimum parking requirements.

Minimum parking requirements are killing good urban development in Miami. Luckily, there has been a push to eliminate parking requirements for small urban buildings (<10,000 sq ft) in recent months.  This is a good first step in the right direction if Miami really aspires to become a walkable and less autocentric city.

Minimum parking requirements perpetuate more automobile use and it also makes housing less affordable since the cost of building and maintaining required parking is passed on to renters and buyers. A few months ago Zillow released a housing report  that cited Miami as the 2nd most expensive city for renters.  The average Miami resident spends 43.2% of their income on rent.

Combine expensive housing with lack of public transit and minimum parking requirements that only serve to perpetuate the use of the automobile; its no wonder why Miami is one of the most expensive car dominated cities in the US.

Eliminating parking requirements would do the following things:

1)     Allows small developers to choose how many parking spaces are needed based on what fits and what buyers or tenants want.

2)      Replaces parking with denser development that generates more property and sales tax for the county and city.

3)     Allows small property owners to keep their property and develop themselves.

4)      Levels the playing field for small Miami property owners.

5)      Allows for the creation of more walkable and denser urban neighborhoods.

6)     Provides greater opportunity to build additional homes within proximity to mass transit corridors – which works to reduces auto traffic on congested roadways.

7)     Works toward retaining housing affordability, by allowing previously undevelopable lots – or lots with limtied development potential – to be built upon,  to meet the future housing needs of all residents.

Below are the details for the reduced parking requirements that are being sought for small urban buildings.  This is currently being advocated for at the commission level, so stay tuned for the resolution.

The proposed text for T4, T5, and T6 is underlined below.  The non-underlined text already exists in Miami 21, a TOD/transit corridor parking reduction that does not apply within 500 ft of single-family/duplex areas (T3).  The proposed text does not change that, it does not apply within 500 feet of T3.  Below is a map of where the proposed text would apply: orange areas around rail stations, purple areas along transit corridors, but not yellow areas within 500 ft of T3.  

“Parking ratio may be reduced within 1/2 mile radius of TOD or within 1/4 mile radius of a Transit Corridor by thirty percent (30%) by process of Waiver, or by one hundred percent (100%) for any Structure that has a Floor Area of ten thousand (10,000) square feet or less, except when site is within 500 feet of T3.”

Let’s hope City of Miami Commissioners can come to their senses and eliminate parking requirements entirely, not just for small urban buildings.

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Join the Miami Young Leaders Group for a special networking event at the Pérez Art Museum Miami in conjunction with PAMM Presents – a program focused on experimental sounds and diverse cross-genre music. Enjoy live outdoor music from internationally-acclaimed artists and drink specials while networking with your peers! More information on the PAMM Presents series can be found  here.
This event will be first come, first serve with 50 free tickets handed out at the door (emails do not qualify as first come and no registration through ULI is required) – so be sure to come early! Once the 50 tickets are handed out, attendee’s may buy a ticket through the Museum for $12.

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Source: Miami Herald

Source: Miami Herald

On Saturday afternoon 10 people were injured at Lemoni Café at Northeast 46th Street and Second Avenue in Buena Vista, after a Toyota Camry carrying three people drove into the cafe’s sidewalk seating area.

It was bound to happen sooner or later and the Buena Vista East Historic Neighborhood Homeowners Association has been warning the County and City for years that NE 2nd Avenue isn’t safe or suitable for pedestrians.  Both the City and County have chosen to ignore requests by residents and businesses to make this road safer and thus should be held partially responsible for this crash and for the death of a pedestrian about a year ago.

It is simply unfathomable to me that the County and City would even allow for the conditions that created the scenario for this crash to exist.  Both fail to recognize hat the current 35 mph speed limit and 40+ mph design speed is unsafe for everyone. The speed limit and design speed of NE 2nd Ave should not exceed 30 mph. No ifs, ands or buts about it.

On the other hand how does the City allow restaurant owners to put patrons in harms way by allowing outdoor dining within inches of cars that are traveling in excess of 45 miles an hour? This is simply reprehensible.

The real problem here is the County and City’s inability to take action on making NE 2nd Avenue safer. In no way am I advocating for the removal of outdoor seating, but until this road is made safer you won’t find me eating at anyone of these outdoor cafes.

This crash is just another fine example of the County and City’s inability to make conditions safer for pedestrians and cyclists. None of our elected officials are pushing to make Miami’s streets safer even though we are the fourth most deadly metropolitan area in the nation for pedestrians and cyclists.  Simply put, our elected officials are turning a blind eye and therefore are negligent when is comes to addressing pedestrian and bicyclist safety.

Below is a letter from the BVEHNA Board of Directors. I’m glad this organization has documented the incompetence of our local government:

 Dear local government representatives:

 See the letter below which has been circulating for about 3 weeks now-after a similar campaign last summer, and now on the heels of a very serious accident in the 4600 block of NE 2nd Avenue.  8 people were injured when a car left the road, went through planters and struck people outside of a cafe.  The car stopped when it finally hit a telephone pole.  There are NO CURBS, and no parallel parking, and the street has been a safety hazard for 3 years now.  THE TIME HAS COME FOR THE CITY AND COUNTY TO TAKE RESPONSIBILITY.  Any action at this point is too late for the restaurant client who DIED crossing the street last year, and now another 8 people injured.  The community is fed up, I as a resident and customer at multiple businesses in this stretch of road am fed up and you need to do your jobs.  We don’t want to hear about the construction moratorium that comes at the end of November, and now we are in a new fiscal year so the lack of funding is not an excuse either.  FIX IT.  IT HAS BEEN 3 YEARS.  I am sure you will receive photos of the damage.  You should feel responsible.

            I am writing this letter to express my concern for the lack of progress on NE 2nd Avenue between NE 42nd Street and NE 50th Street.    If you have driven on this stretch of road, you are no doubt intimately aware of the need to resurface NE 2nd Avenue, and we as residents and neighbors have suffered through at least three years of no progress since the initial work began. 

Almost three years ago, the street was torn up to install new sewer pipes.  In the meantime, street lighting has been sporadic, traffic and new businesses have increased, we’ve seen an increase in traffic accidents, a fatality of one of the restaurant patrons, an increase in burglaries and thefts, and no doubt, many motor vehicles have suffered. 

In June of summer 2013, many neighbors voiced concerns through a letter/email campaign asking where the progress was on street resurfacing, parking, curbs, expanded sidewalks and landscaping.  A plan that incorporated all of those issues except landscaping had been developed when the road was torn up, with the only issue being a request for more landscaping instead of palm trees as the completed section of NE 2nd Avenue shows just north of NE 54th Street. 

            As a result of the letter writing campaign that reached both city and county commissioners, as well as Mayor Regalado, the City of Miami said that work would begin towards the end of 2013 due to the change in fiscal year.  It was then pushed back to the beginning of 2014 due to Art Basel and various winter festivities.  It’s now October of 2014 and the excuses bounce back between the city and the country, and the finger of blame has even been pointed at Buena Vista East residents for wanting shade landscaping so that NE 2nd Avenue would be more pedestrian friendly, like the Design District.

 In addition, the pedestrian safety factor is becoming a larger issue-parking between 46th and 47th Street has almost a 1 foot drop off due to erosion, and the sidewalk is eroded or completely covered, giving pedestrians no choice but to walk in the street.  NE 2nd Avenue crowns higher than sidewalks on both sides and many areas flood when it rains.  There are no crosswalks indicated nor any other safety markings for the entire length of this area.

 However, the key partners in this endeavor, the City of Miami and Miami-Dade County, are still passing the buck and have yet to begin any sort of repairs to the streets or improvements to sidewalks and drainage.  The poor economy excuse is gone, development and developers are booming, money was allegedly allotted for this project, and we still have an eyesore along NE 2ndAvenue in an area with 7 restaurants, several boutique clothing shops, and several specialty shops ranging from gifts and furniture to fine wines and chocolates, as well as a small grocery store. 

 Find the funding to complete this stretch of road.  We’ve been too patient for too long.

 

The NE 2nd Avenue County and City circus act needs to come to an end before someone else is killed. I expect the County and City to be proactive and not reactive. Both the County and City should work towards implementing complete streets policies.

Meanwhile in NYC the speed limit throughout the entire city was reduced to 25 mph and NYC Mayor de Blasio adopted Vision Zero, which aims to achieve no fatalities or serious injuries.  In Miami Dade County our elected officials seem to have zero vision.

 

Art Days Bicycle

 

Miami-Dade Transit has no plan to extend Metrorail nor is Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) on their radar in the foreseeable future.  Take a look at their 10-year plan; complete fluff with no substance, no future transit vision, or measurable goals ( ie. add X miles of BRT or add X bus shelters, Baylink extension).  Essentially Miami Dade Transit has no game plan for the next 10 years. See for yourselves.

 

There is still time to let MDT know how elementary their 10 year plan is:

The MDT10Ahead draft document is now available for review on the MDT10Ahead project website.

 Please review the MDT10Ahead draft document and submit your comments by email or mail to: Miami-Dade Transit, Planning & Development, 701 NW 1st Court, 15th Floor, Miami, FL 33136. Correspondence must be postmarked no later than September 26th, 2014 in order to be considered for this update.

 

Via CNBC

 

Click to enlarge:

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Screen Shot 2014-04-29 at 10.38.42 AMClick on this link to send Miami Commissioners an email to voice your support for this parking exemption.

Minimum parking requirements are killing good urban development in Miami. Luckily, there has been a push to eliminate parking requirements for small urban buildings (<10,000 sq ft) in recent months.  This is a good first step in the right direction if Miami really aspires to become a walkable and less autocentric city.

Minimum parking requirements perpetuate more automobile use and it also makes housing less affordable since the cost of building and maintaining required parking is passed on to renters and buyers. A few months ago Zillow released a housing report  that cited Miami as the 2nd most expensive city for renters.  The average Miami resident spends 43.2% of their income on rent.

Combine expensive housing with lack of public transit and minimum parking requirements that only serve to perpetuate the use of the automobile; its no wonder why Miami is one of the most expensive car dominated cities in the US.

Eliminating parking requirements would do the following things:

1) Allows small developers to choose how many parking spaces are needed based on what fits and what buyers or tenants want.
2) Replaces parking with denser development that generates more property and sales tax for the county and city.
3) Allows small property owners to keep their property and develop themselves.
4) Levels the playing field for small Miami property owners.
5) Allows for the creation of more walkable and denser urban neighborhoods.

Below are the details for the reduced parking requirements that are being sought for small urban buildings.  This is currently being advocated for at the commission level, so stay tuned for the resolution.

The proposed text for T4, T5, and T6 is underlined below.  The non-underlined text already exists in Miami 21, a TOD/transit corridor parking reduction that does not apply within 500 ft of single-family/duplex areas (T3).  The proposed text does not change that, it does not apply within 500 feet of T3.  Below is a map of where the proposed text would apply: orange areas around rail stations, purple areas along transit corridors, but not yellow areas within 500 ft of T3.  

“Parking ratio may be reduced within 1/2 mile radius of TOD or within 1/4 mile radius of a Transit Corridor by thirty percent (30%) by process of Waiver, or by one hundred percent (100%) for any Structure that has a Floor Area of ten thousand (10,000) square feet or less, except when site is within 500 feet of T3.”

Let’s hope City of Miami Commissioners can come to their senses and eliminate parking requirements entirely, not just for small urban buildings.

Click on this link to send Miami Commissioners an email to voice your support for this parking exemption.

 

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Cyclists will meet at Government Center at 6:30 p.m. and take off around 7

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Come prepared to get your TOD on…

Click here to register

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MiamiDesignCharrette_FinalwSponsors (1)

 
Watch Commissioner and Chair of the County Finance Committee, Mr. Esteban Bovo, blame the lack of better public transportation options in Miami-Dade County on everything from the hot sun to immigrants who come to Miami because they crave the freedom of the open road (what!?!?), then segue into a discussion about the hundreds of millions being spent on highway expansion in MDC. Unreal. We can do better, Miami. This worldview belongs in the 1950′s and this chronic lack of vision is failing us all.
Prepare to get roasted Commissioner…. Let the comments begin. Feel free to send him an email too.

 


AAF Mobility

REGISTER ONLINE

72-hour cancellation notice required

For more information contact: Tania Valenzuela

305-577-5491 | tvalenzuela@miamichamber.com

 

Screen Shot 2014-04-29 at 10.38.42 AMMinimum parking requirements are killing good urban development in Miami. Luckily, there has been a push to eliminate parking requirements for small urban buildings (<10,000 sq ft) in recent months.  This is a good first step in the right direction if Miami really aspires to become a walkable and less autocentric city.

Minimum parking requirements perpetuate more automobile use and it also makes housing less affordable since the cost of building and maintaining required parking is passed on to renters and buyers. Two weeks ago Zillow released ahousing report  that cited Miami as the 2nd most expensive city for renters.  The average Miami resident spends 43.2% of their income on rent.\

Combine expensive housing with lack of public transit and minimum parking requirements that only serve to perpetuate the use of the automobile; its no wonder why Miami is one of the most expensive car dominated cities in the US.

Eliminating parking requirements would do the following things:

1) Allows small developers to choose how many parking spaces are needed based on what fits and what buyers or tenants want.
2) Replaces parking with denser development that generates more property and sales tax for the county and city.
3) Allows small property owners to keep their property and develop themselves.
4) Levels the playing field for small Miami property owners.
5) Allows for the creation of more walkable and denser urban neighborhoods.

Below are the details for the reduced parking requirements that are being sought for small urban buildings.  This is currently being advocated for at the commission level, so stay tuned for the resolution.

The proposed text for T4, T5, and T6 is underlined below.  The non-underlined text already exists in Miami 21, a TOD/transit corridor parking reduction that does not apply within 500 ft of single-family/duplex areas (T3).  The proposed text does not change that, it does not apply within 500 feet of T3.  Below is a map of where the proposed text would apply: orange areas around rail stations, purple areas along transit corridors, but not yellow areas within 500 ft of T3.  

“Parking ratio may be reduced within 1/2 mile radius of TOD or within 1/4 mile radius of a Transit Corridor by thirty percent (30%) by process of Waiver, or by one hundred percent (100%) for any Structure that has a Floor Area of ten thousand (10,000) square feet or less, except when site is within 500 feet of T3.”.

Let’s hope City of Miami Commissioners can come to their senses and eliminate parking requirements entirely, not just for small urban buildings.

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Donald Shoup, author of The High Cost of Free Parking and distinguished professor of urban planning at UCLA, will give a talk on Monday, April 21 from 8 to 10 AM at AIA’s Miami Center for Architecture & Design, 100 NE 1 Ave, Miami, FL 33132.

Shoup is the godfather of the scientific study of parking, and has spoken widely about the benefits of eliminating required parking for mobility and urbanism.  Shoup writes: “This doesn’t mean, however, that developers won’t provide off-street parking. It simply means that urban planners won’t tell developers exactly how many parking spaces they must provide before they can get a building permit. Developers will provide the parking spaces they think buyers demand.”

Capacity is limited, RSVP at shoupmiami.eventbrite.com and send to all your contacts, followers, members, students, etc.  Continental breakfast will be served.  Supported by the Knight Foundation, AIA Miami, APA Gold Coast Section, and Townhouse Center.

Shoup Flyer

 
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